Course Descriptions

Education Counseling

MEC 6400
Introduction to School Counseling & Theories
3 credits

This course will serve two purposes: to introduce school counseling candidates to the traditional counseling theories and to provide an understanding of the historical significance of school counseling as a profession. Candidates examine various psychological theories that have been used as the basis for counseling. Candidates investigate non-directive and directive client-centered approaches to counseling, including the psychoanalytic approach, the traditional Rogerian, the Adlerian, Reality Theory, and the Gestalt approach. Each theory is evaluated in terms of usability in school settings. Additionally, candidates gain an understanding about the historical context of the school counseling field and ways in which key historical events and educational reforms shaped the progression of the field.

Prerequisite(s): College Level=Graduate, MED 6102

MEC 6402
Human Behavior and Child Development
3 credits

This course is designed to prepare the candidate to apply knowledge of human behavior and child development to address issues using prevention, intervention and education. Emphasis is placed on the child and adolescent cognitive, social/emotional, and physical development factors which impact on the child’s learning, behavior, and the counseling process. Theoretical models of development as well as current research-based literature will be utilized.

MEC 6511
Principles & Practices of a School Counseling Program (capstone course)
6 credits

The primary focus of this course is to acquire the knowledge and skills to understand and implement a comprehensive school counseling program based on the ASCA National Model. The ASCA National Model themes of leadership, advocacy, collaboration and systemic change and the National Model quadrants of foundation, delivery, management and accountability are explored in detail. In addition, this course presents the challenges of the school counseling reform agenda of the past 25 years and how school counselors proactively responded to the call for providing every child with a quality education. A context is established to address what school counselors need to know and be able to do to successfully work with every student in the K-12 environment. School counselor skills including social justice advocacy, working with special populations and creating safe school environments are discussed. This is a capstone course and is to be taken immediately before the commencement of the clinical semester.

Prerequisite(s): MED 6102, MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7701, MEC 7503, MEC 7202 & MEC 7501

MEC 6600
Introduction to Drug/Alcohol Counseling
3 credits

This course addresses the fundamental concepts and issues necessary to gain a basic understanding of drug/alcohol counseling. Participants will be able to define chemical dependency and describe the various models of addiction. Criteria for Substance Abuse Disorders will be examined and applied to illustrative case studies. Participants will also be able to identify and discuss the unique clinical issues involved in treating the rising population. These include: denial and defenses, stages of recovery, relapse and relapse prevention counseling, shame and guilt, co-occurring disorders, effects on the family, intervention, and 12-Step groups. Modalities of treatment and treatment practices will also be discussed. The participants will gain an understanding of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to be an effective counselor. The participants will be introduced to a code of ethics for the professional and will be able to discuss its importance.

Prerequisite(s): MED 6102, MEC 6400 & MEC 6402

MEC 6607
Ethical Issues in School Counseling
3 credits

This course provides an important overview of the school counseling profession in the United States with an emphasis on the application of ethical and legal processes to current school issues. The course will delve into the basics of ethics, values and morals against the backdrop of school counseling. In addition, important ethical and legal issues will be analyzed such as: informed consent, confidentiality and privileged communications, records, technology and subpoenas, professionalism and malpractice, resolving legal and ethical issues, codes of ethics and standards for practice.

MEC 6608
Multicultural Counseling
3 credits

This course is created for school counselors to assist in recognizing and understanding the personal and cultural dynamics that exist in schools today. This course will address the development of a "new counselor" who will form a partnership with teachers, parents and administrators that will introduce and explore strategies and techniques to address the challenges of school populations with diverse personal, cultural, cognitive, emotional and gender differences. This partnership will promote a wholesome school community of shared understanding and common educational goals.

Prerequisite(s): MED 6102, MEC 6400, and MEC 6402

MEC 6901
Classification of Psychopathology
3 credits

The new DSM -5 classification system of psychopathology will be studied with emphasis on symptomatology, etiology, and implications for treatment modalities. Special emphasis will be given to the new research based system of diagnosis as it impacts students and educational systems. Various treatment interventions, including the adjunctive use of medications, are presented.

Prerequisite(s): MED 6102, MEC 6400, and MEC 6402

MEC 7202
Group Counseling
3 credits

Group Counseling is a 3 credit course that requires a 25 hour practicum in a qualified school setting.* Candidates investigate group dynamics and processes related to counseling theory by participating in group counseling demonstrations. This course is designed for candidates to gain group counseling skills, self-awareness about one’s own qualities, needs, motivations, and values that can either facilitate or interfere with one’s effectiveness as a group participant and group leader. Group counseling will be clearly differentiated from group guidance. Potential uses of group counseling in schools and methods of organizing group counseling sessions are addressed. Candidates are expected to arrange a visit to a school or agency to observe an actual group session at the level for which they are seeking certification or the age group with which they will be involved. *Note: All clearances (criminal background check, TB and child protective registry) must completed and on file prior to registering for the course. To register for this course students must have completed MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7701 and have at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Prerequisite(s): College Level= Graduate and MED 6102, MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701 and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 7213
College & Career Readiness K-12
3 credits

The purpose of this course is to enable candidates to understand, apply, and formulate programs as they apply to postsecondary planning and career readiness. Candidates will develop an understanding of the role of the school counselor, especially as this relates to developing a college-going and career readiness culture for all students, particularly students in poverty or facing other barriers to postsecondary planning. This course includes a focus on engaging students in early career awareness, planning, and making informed postsecondary choices crossing the spectrum of K-12 and using the ASCA National Model as a framework. Candidates will learn about the usefulness of data to guide academic planning, and the steps involved for transitioning students from elementary school to middle school to high school, and then to postsecondary training and college. This course also includes topics that relate to postsecondary planning, including NCAA eligibility criteria, financial literacy, financial aid, career selection, NOSCA 8 Components of College & Career Readiness, ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors Standards, completing FAFSA’s, and the college admissions process.

http://nosca.collegeboard.org/eight-components

MEC 7500
Individual Counseling Skills and Strategies
6 credits

Individual Counseling Skills and Strategies is a 6 credit semester course that equips a novice school counselor's tool belt with tools and techniques to counsel individual students. The course provides novice counselors with opportunities to learn and apply theory, strategies, and techniques to assist students with social/emotional development, academic development, career development, and/or crisis intervention.  Counselors will apply ethical and legal standards to individual counseling sessions and to real life practical applications.  Counselors will learn and apply intervention strategies to meet the needs of students that reflect current issues in our schools today.  This course will also provide opportunities to learn and apply a variety of data collection methods and student monitoring that may lead to the referral process.

During this course, students will learn and practice basic counseling/interpersonal skills.  *Note: All clearances (criminal background check, TB and child protective registry) must be completed and on file prior to registering for the course.  


Prerequisite(s): College Level= Graduate AND MED 6102, MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701 and have at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 7501
Family Counseling
3 credits

The family structure is explored as candidates learn how to meet the needs of children at school through family counseling.  Knowledge of family dynamics, social and cultural issues, and parenting education are explored as the class considers issues of sexuality, child abuse, substance abuse, sex-equity, and the impact of special needs children on the family structure. Socioeconomic, ethnic background and  race are addressed in terms of their influence on children in families. Candidates will research and report  on community and agency resources and referral services available for children and their families.

*Note: All clearances (criminal background check, TB and child protective registry) must be completed and on file prior to registering for the course.  


Prerequisite(s): College Level = graduate and MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701 and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 7502
The Counselor as Consultant
3 credits

This course focuses on the counselor as consultant in matters concerning child behavior, test interpretation, grades, and a child’s ability to function socially, academically, and physically. Strategies for consulting with teachers, administrators, and parents are explored in order to help the child develop skills to be successful in the school setting. Candidates examine distinctions between counseling and consulting and the need to increase collaborative consultations in schools, families, and the community.

Prerequisite(s): College Level= graduate and MED 6102

MEC 7503
Special Education Law and the School Counselor's Role
3 credits

This course reviews special education law, including relevant statutes, cases, and regulations. Students will receive advanced training in the development, monitoring, and implementation of IEPs and 504 Plans as related to school counseling. The course addresses professional issues related to the school counselor’s role in the evaluation, referral, monitoring, and consultation of students with special needs. In addition, this course will help to develop awareness of one’s own values, attitudes, and beliefs as they relate to school counseling with students with special needs and their families.

MEC 7600
Non-Certification Supervised Counseling Practicum
3 credits

This non-certification practicum course will give graduate students an opportunity for counseling skill development and competence demonstration as counselors while participating in a clinical experience that does not lead to State of Delaware certification. Clinical hours, course assignments, intervention project and clinical seminars must be completed over the duration of a full 15-week semester. Students who choose this course option are subsequently not eligible for school counseling certification in the State of Delaware. This may impact the certification eligibility for other states. It is the responsibility of the student to keep current with certification requirements of states other than Delaware. The minimum of one hundred (100) hours must be completed to fulfill practicum requirement.

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202 and Cum 3.0 GPA

MEC 7701
Testing, Measurements, and Research in School Counseling
3 credits

This course is designed to prepare future school counselors to analyze and understand the scope and purposes of testing programs and the process of test administration. Candidates will explore commonly used assessment instruments that address learner aptitude, achievement, interest, intelligence, content areas, and traits like self-esteem, values, and modalities to help in the decision making process. Statistics necessary to understand and interpret test and research data will be examined. Candidates will learn how to gather information through research, such as questionnaires and follow-up studies. The methods for analyzing the data and reporting the results will be described. The use of computers and other technology in scoring and interpreting tests and other research data will be explored. An individual research project is required.

MEC 7806
Research Methods, Statistics, and Accountability in School Counseling
3 credits

The focus of this course is to present common research concepts that will be applied to improve the practice of school counseling. The course will stress the importance for a strong research foundation emphasizing empirically supported interventions leading to evidence based practices in a comprehensive school guidance program. Accountability is addressed in the context of the ASCA national model; activities that demonstrate the counselor and program effectiveness are discussed. Basic statistics (descriptive and inferential) and research design methods will be presented.

Prerequisite(s): MED 6102, MEC 6400 and MEC 6402

MEC 8004
Elementary School Counseling Fall Internship
3 credits

The elementary school counseling internship affords an opportunity for candidates to practice and enhance skills learned during academic coursework, while obtaining close supervision from their Cooperating Counselor on-site and Clinical Faculty Mentor off-site. Candidates will demonstrate skills associated with program implementation/evaluation as outlined by ASCA, including leadership, advocacy and collaboration as they relate to academic, career/college readiness, and the social/emotional needs of children. Candidates are expected to demonstrate components of the ASCA National Model. In addition to programmatic elements, candidates are expected to participate in self-reflection and self-evaluation exercises to enhance counseling skills. 

This internship is a one-semester supervised opportunity for the candidate to perform all the activities that a regularly-employed certified school counselor would be expected to perform. Candidates seeking state certification as a school counselor must be supervised on-site by a school counselor with a minimum of three years’ experience in a K-6 grade school setting. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours, including a minimum of 240 clock hours of direct service work with the remaining 60 hours of indirect service work, reflective of ASCA Best Practices.

Over the course of the semester, candidates will engage in processes congruent with the ASCA National Model, such as: 1. Candidate competency checklist (using the components of the ASCA model and Delaware DPAS II); 2. Action plans (closing-the-gap, small group and curricula) and 3. Design and implementation of a guidance lesson plan unit based on a needs assessment and student data. 

Candidates work to meet the developmental needs of students in areas of social, emotional, educational, and vocational wellness. Candidates will be challenged to appropriately conceptualize student needs and collaborate with other professionals to best meet the identified needs of students, through such activities as individual, small group and classroom guidance instruction. 

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 8005
Secondary School Counseling Fall Internship
3 credits

The secondary school counseling internship affords an opportunity for candidates to practice and enhance skills learned during academic coursework, while obtaining close supervision from their Cooperating Counselor on-site and Clinical Faculty Mentor off-site. Candidates will demonstrate skills associated with program implementation/evaluation as outlined by ASCA, including leadership, advocacy and collaboration as they relate to academic, career/college readiness, and the social/emotional needs of children. Candidates are expected to demonstrate components of the ASCA National Model. In addition to programmatic elements, candidates are expected to participate in self-reflection and self-evaluation exercises to enhance counseling skills.

This internship is a one-semester supervised opportunity for the candidate to perform all the activities that a regularly-employed certified school counselor would be expected to perform. Candidates seeking state certification as a school counselor must be supervised on-site by a school counselor with a minimum of three years’ experience in a 7th-12th grade school setting. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours, including a minimum of 240 clock hours of direct service work with the remaining 60 hours of indirect service work, reflective of ASCA Best Practices.

Over the course of the semester, candidates will engage in processes congruent with the ASCA National Model, such as: 1. Candidate competency checklist (using the components of the ASCA model and Delaware DPAS II); 2. Action plans (closing-the-gap, small group and curricula) and 3. Design and implementation of a college and career readiness program based on a needs assessment and school data.

Candidates work to meet the developmental needs of students in areas of social, emotional, educational, and vocational wellness. Candidates will be challenged to appropriately conceptualize student needs and collaborate with other professionals to best meet the identified needs of students, through such activities as individual, small group and classroom guidance instruction.

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 8006
Elementary School Counseling Spring Internship
3 credits

The elementary school counseling internship affords an opportunity for candidates to practice and enhance skills learned during academic coursework, while obtaining close supervision from their Cooperating Counselor on-site and Clinical Faculty Mentor off-site. Candidates will demonstrate skills associated with program implementation/evaluation as outlined by ASCA, including leadership, advocacy and collaboration as they relate to academic, career/college readiness, and the social/emotional needs of children. Candidates are expected to demonstrate components of the ASCA National Model. In addition to programmatic elements, candidates are expected to participate in self-reflection and self-evaluation exercises to enhance counseling skills.

This internship is a one-semester supervised opportunity for the candidate to perform all the activities that a regularly-employed certified school counselor would be expected to perform. Candidates seeking state certification as a school counselor must be supervised on-site by a school counselor with a minimum of three years’ experience in a K-6 grade school setting. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours, including a minimum of 240 clock hours of direct service work with the remaining 60 hours of indirect service work, reflective of ASCA Best Practices.

Over the course of the semester, candidates will engage in processes congruent with the ASCA National Model, such as: 1. Candidate competency checklist (using the components of the ASCA model and Delaware DPAS II); 2. Action plans (closing-the-gap, small group and curricula) and 3. Design and implementation of a group counseling unit based on a needs assessment and school data.

Candidates work to meet the developmental needs of students in areas of social, emotional, educational, and vocational wellness. Candidates will be challenged to appropriately conceptualize student needs and collaborate with other professionals to best meet the identified needs of students, through such activities as individual, small group and classroom guidance instruction. 

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 8007
Secondary School Counseling Spring Internship
3 credits

The secondary school counseling internship affords an opportunity for candidates to practice and enhance skills learned during academic coursework, while obtaining close supervision from their Cooperating Counselor on-site and Clinical Faculty Mentor off-site. Candidates will demonstrate skills associated with program implementation/evaluation as outlined by ASCA, including leadership, advocacy and collaboration as they relate to academic, career/college readiness, and the social/emotional needs of children. Candidates are expected to demonstrate components of the ASCA National Model. In addition to programmatic elements, candidates are expected to participate in self-reflection and self-evaluation exercises to enhance counseling skills.

This internship is a one-semester supervised opportunity for the candidate to perform all the activities that a regularly-employed certified school counselor would be expected to perform. Candidates seeking state certification as a school counselor must be supervised on-site by a school counselor with a minimum of three years’ experience in a 7th-12th grade school setting. The internship requires a minimum of 300 clock hours, including a minimum of 240 clock hours of direct service work with the remaining 60 hours of indirect service work, reflective of ASCA Best Practices.

Over the course of the semester, candidates will engage in processes congruent with the ASCA National Model, such as: 1. Candidate competency checklist (using the components of the ASCA model and Delaware DPAS II); 2. Action plans (closing-the-gap, small group and curricula) and 3. Design and implementation of an intervention project based on a needs assessment and school data.

Candidates work to meet the developmental needs of students in areas of social, emotional, educational, and vocational wellness. Candidates will be challenged to appropriately conceptualize student needs and collaborate with other professionals to best meet the identified needs of students, through such activities as individual, small group and classroom guidance instruction.

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 8015
Mental Health Seminar
3 credits

Unmet mental health needs can be a significant obstacle to student academic, career and social/emotional development and even compromise school safety. Schools are often one of the first places where mental health crises and needs of students are recognized and initially addressed (Froeschle & Meyers, 2004). Most students in need do not receive adequate mental health supports (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2013). Research indicates 20 percent of students are in need of mental health services, yet only one out of five of these students receive the necessary services (Kaffenberger & Seligman, 2007). Furthermore, students of color and those from families with low income are at greater risk for mental health need

Students in this course will gain knowledge and understanding of prevalent mental health issues in order to recognize and respond to the need for mental health and behavioral prevention, early intervention and crisis services that promote psychosocial wellness and development for all students. As a result of taking this course, students will be able to address barriers and assess ways to maximize success in the k-12 school environment. Students will impact communities and their family structure through education, prevention, and crisis and short-term intervention until the k-12 student is connected with available community resources.

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

MEC 8017
School Counselor Leadership Seminar
3 credits

Many experts contend that leadership is a central role of the school counselor (ASCA, 2012a; Dollarhide & Gibson, 2008).  Strong leadership is the foundation for a school counselor to be effective in advocacy and collaboration work not only for children, families, and school communities, but for the advancement of the school counseling profession (ASCA, 2012a; House & Sears, 2002).  The American School Counselor Association underscored the importance of leadership by placing it as one of the four major themes along with collaboration, advocacy and systemic change of the National Model (Curry & DeVoss, 2009; Janson, 2009).  ASCA included leadership in the preamble to the ASCA’s (2010b) Ethical Standards for School Counselors (Curry & DeVoss, 2009).  Peppered throughout the ASCA School Counselor Competencies document is the concept of leadership (ASCA, 2012b; Shillingford & Lambie, 2010).  Experts working on the Transforming School Counseling Initiative (TSCI) contended that effective leadership is the hallmark of a school counselor who works collaboratively with various stakeholders to close the achievement gap while ensuring all students succeed (Shillingford & Lambie, 2010; Steen & Rudd, 2009; Trolley, 2011).  

This seminar is designed to facilitate leadership and advocacy development. It explores leadership styles and advocacy models to help counselor candidates understand and prepare for future leadership roles within the context of the K-12 school setting.  Candidates will gain critical knowledge of qualities, principles, skills and styles of effective leadership and an understanding of the important role of the school counselor as a systems change agent as it relates to child advocacy and social justice work.

Prerequisite(s): MEC 6400, MEC 6402, MEC 6607, MEC 7213, MEC 7502, MEC 7503, MEC 7701, MEC 7500, MEC 7501, MEC 7202, passing scores on Praxis II (#5421), all clearances and at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.