Faculty Development Day Fall 2011

Academic Quality: An Oktoberfest of Ideas!


Saturday – October 22, 2011
8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Doberstein Admissions Center Auditorium (DAC)
New Castle Campus      Directions…

Casual Dress


Join us as we celebrate Wilmington University's mission of providing quality and excellence in instruction to our students.

Fall's 2011 Faculty Development Day program offers a wide variety of workshops designed to help you continue providing excellent instruction to our students with programs which meet the mission, values, and strategic initiatives of the University.

The workshops and their descriptions are listed below. Please make a selection from Workshop 1 and Workshop 2. If you select the grading workshop or culture awareness workshop, please only select one workshop.

Registration is closed.
If you would still like to register for this workshop, please email Nancy Doody at nancy.c.doody@wilmu.edu
or Taquana Woodards at taquana.c.woodards@wilmu.edu.


Sample Agenda

Workshops


Effective Grading Tips – Presented by Janice Wardle, Assistant Professor & Chair-Sports Management and Anne Peoples, Adjunct Instructor - College of Business. This workshop will provide an overview of grading at the University.  Topics will include the WU grading system, attendance, decisions about grades, and using the Class Information and Schedule to clarify grading methods, attendance, classroom policies, etc.  Also included will be an overview of the Grade Appeal process.  This workshop is 2 parts – please register for Parts 1 & 2.
10:00 am – 12:05 pm

Teaching 101 - Presented by Kara DiCecco, Assistant Professor & Chair, Nursing Leadership Program and Bonnie Kirkpatrick, Director of Online Learning & Assistant Professor – College of Business.  This workshop is designed for instructors who are new to the field of teaching and education or for those who would like to revisit the basics of pedagogy.   Many of the decisions affecting the success of a course take place well before the first day of class. Careful planning facilitates student learning and makes teaching less stressful and more enjoyable.  In this workshop we will cover the basics of teaching and prepping for your course:
    – Identifying the Situational Constraints
    – Understanding the difference between a goal, an objective and an outcome.
    – Aligning objectives, outcomes, activities, resources and assessments.
    – Designing instruction that helps students to develop higher order thinking skills.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

Help! My Students can’t Write and I can’t Edit. - Presented by Maria Hess, Adjunct Instructor – College of Business.  There is a way to edit for both content and grammar without pulling your hair out.   Poor writing is a national epidemic. The Internet, instant messaging and texting are partly to blame, largely because cell phones, email and texting constitute the modern communication universe. But poor writing is not only a reflection of a student’s skills; it also is representative of the university he or she attends—and worse, the efforts of some of his or her instructors. Most adjuncts are frustrated by students’ writing skills, but are so busy reading for content that they overlook the actual editing of grammatical mistakes. Using real-life, edited papers from graduate and undergraduate students at Wilmington University, this workshop will explore the common grammatical mistakes that students make and offer proofreading techniques for editors of all levels.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

Engaging Students by Creating Culturally Responsive Classroom Environments. Presented by Adrienne Bey, Assistant Professor and Patrice Gilliam-Johnson – College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.  Students enter our classrooms with various levels of academic preparation.  Not only do these various levels of academic preparation influence how students perceive and process information, so do their cultural backgrounds and social influences. This workshop will assist instructors in understanding the important connection between cultural competency and student achievement.  This workshop will discuss topics that go from “knowledge” to “implementation”, so that instructors can build upon the uniqueness of their students to create engaging student-centered learning environments.   This workshop is 2 parts – please register for Parts 1 & 2.
10:00 am – 12:05 pm

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due (Plagiarism – The Faculty Perspective: Detection & Prevention). Presented by Katherine Cottle, Assistant Professor and Chair, English - College of Arts & Sciences. A number of studies indicate that students frequently are not aware of what constitutes plagiarism, other studies show what appears to be a consistent and deliberate pattern of cheating on exams and plagiarizing other’s works at educational institutions.  Plagiarism can be accidental or deliberate, whichever the case, it is becoming a major problem and hot topic on campuses across America.  This session will help educators to guide their students away from “accidental borrowing,” provide free methods to detect copied text, supply attendees with websites useful for educating students about plagiarism.    Other topics include: Why students plagiarize, warning signs of possible plagiarism, and the main types of plagiarism.  Additional information will be provided about using the Blackboard Tool, Safe Assign.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due (Plagiarism – The Faculty Perspective: Detection & Prevention). Presented by Kelly Rouke, Adjunct Professor - College of Arts & Sciences.
A number of studies indicate that students frequently are not aware of what constitutes plagiarism, other studies show what appears to be a consistent and deliberate pattern of cheating on exams and plagiarizing other’s works at educational institutions.  Plagiarism can be accidental or deliberate, whichever the case, it is becoming a major problem and hot topic on campuses across America.  This session will help educators to guide their students away from “accidental borrowing,” provide free methods to detect copied text, supply attendees with websites useful for educating students about plagiarism.    Other topics include: Why students plagiarize, warning signs of possible plagiarism, and the main types of plagiarism.  Additional information will be provided about using the Blackboard Tool, Safe Assign.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

Understanding and Using your IDEA Evaluation Results to improve your teaching. Presented by Ernie Linsay, Assistant Professor & Director – Faculty Development & Support and Nina Campanicki, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support Team – Faculty Development & Support.  What does the acronym “IDEA” stand for? How are the Important and Essential Objectives for my course identified?  What do all those numbers and tables in the report I receive really mean? What are “raw” and “adjusted” scores? How can the IDEA results help me improve my teaching effectiveness? This workshop will lift the fog that often surrounds the IDEA Evaluation process and results.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

911! What to do when f2f class is simply not an option. Presented by Tish Gallagher, Academic Online Liaison and Assistant Professor – College of Health Professions.  Our recent spate of “interesting weather events” reminds us that we are not always in control. Our best laid plans for traditional face-to-face (f2f) classes can go awry when weather or personal health problems interfere. What to do when you are unable to meet f2f will be presented in this session. Available resources, using web-enhanced capabilities, communicating with students, and the need for flexibility will all be addressed. Some “real life” examples will be considered.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm

Discovery to Delivery: Bringing the Library to the Student. Presented by Jim McCloskey, Director – Library and Faculty Librarians.  From e-books to e-journals, the Library offers an array of online scholarly and popular resources useful for the assignments.  We will also show you how the library and its services can help you prepare for your class. This session will introduce you to these resources and the many ways library staff can assist you in your courses through tools such as LibGuides and research tools, and development of course-specific library exercises.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
11:05 am – 12:05 pm