Fall 2014 Faculty Development Day

Saturday October 18th, 2014

New Castle Campus - Doberstein Admissions and Classroom Center (DAC)


REGISTER NOW!

Wilmington University has done quite a bit of reflection on the growth we have experienced as an institution and what the future holds for our faculty and students as we prepare for our visit from Middle States scheduled for next spring.  Please join us in the discussion of how Our Story Unfolds at our Fall 2014 Faculty Development Day on Saturday, October 18th.

Agenda - Fall 2014 Faculty Development Day
8:00 am. – 2:00 p.m.

8:00 – 8:30

Sign in, Continental Breakfast (on 3rd floor)

8:30 – 9:30

College Meeting

9:30 – 9:40

Break

9:40 – 10:40

Focused Discussion - Mission, vision, and values of the University, the  Middle States Self-Study

10:40 – 10:50

Break

10:50 – 11:50

Workshop Selection 1

11:50 – 12:00

Break

12:00 – 1:00

Workshop Selection 2

1:00 – 2:00

Lunch (available on 1st and 3rd floors), University Updates, Announcements, and  Raffle Drawings


REGISTER NOW!

Sessions for the 10:50-11:50am time slot:

Culturally Responsive Engagement Strategies (Room 202).  Presented by Taryn L. Fletcher, Adjunct Faculty.
The Culturally Responsive Engagement Strategies workshop will introduce and explore Dr. Robert Marzano's four questions to achieving high quality student engagement through the lens of culturally responsiveness.  Participants will interpret and apply engagement strategies and differentiated instructional practices, while reflecting on the four conditions necessary for cultural responsive teaching.

Term Paper: Meaningful Alternatives (Room 309).  Presented by Ciro Poppiti, III, Adjunct Faculty. 
We are a real-world university, so shouldn't we teach real-world writing techniques?  Our students won't be writing term papers in their careers, but they will most certainly have to write effective emails and memos.  Serendipitously, by focusing classroom time on shorter writing projects, we can actually improve student proficiency.  This workshop focuses on alternatives to the term paper, whether teaching face-to-face or online.  We will delve into the classic 5-paragraph essay, explaining why it is such an important writing technique.  We will look at how to turn students from "reporting" facts to using facts to "prove" their theses.  A number of easy-to-apply tips will be shared, including a pro forma model that teachers can immediately implement.

Responding to Troubled and Troubling Students (Room 311) Presented by Gary Donahue, Assistant Professor – College of Arts & Sciences and Coordinator of Student Issues/Concerns - Student Affairs; and Jack Cunningham, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President-University Safety.
In our efforts to provide for the needs of all students we are sometimes required to provide feedback to students who manifest inappropriate, disruptive, or disturbing behaviors.  This workshop will help instructor's distinguish between a student who is overly challenging and a student who may be in crises.  The workshop will provide specific strategies for responding to students who disrupt the learning environment, inappropriately respond to teacher direction/correction, or attempt to engage the instructor in an "email war".  Additionally, knowing how to identify, confront, and care for students who appear to exhibit behaviors that raise questions about a student's health or well-being will also be addressed.  This workshop will provide practical insights related to these concerns and also identify specific steps that can be taken when "feedback of a different kind" is needed.

Giving Your Students the Keys to Success.   (Room 216) Presented by Debbie B. Taylor, Manager-Student Success Center and Adjunct Faculty, and Sally Healy, Director-Student Success Center. 
The Student Success Center offers a wide range of services that help our students achieve academic success.  Whether they are incoming freshman, a returning adult student, a transfer student, or a graduate student, the SSC can provide our students with the support and resources necessary to achieve their goals.  Realize the power you have to inspire your students to choose success.

Discovery as the Precursor to Reading and Citation in the Academic Endeavor.(Room 204) Presented by Jim McCloskey, Director-Library and Assistant Professor-
The WilmU Library collects and provides access to thousands of ejournals and ebooks. But as someone recently noted, If we can't find it, as readers, we certainly won't be using it." The search process for quality, relevant resources has morphed from a context in which students were focused on a defined subset of content (ie, a single bibliographic database) to an environment through which a single search box, known as "web-scale discovery," can unveil the entire range of library content. This workshop will introduce the University community to the Library's new Discovery system.

Cultural Variation in the Classroom:  Who Are Our Students? (Room 312) Presented by Adriana Marini Cossetti, Adjunct Faculty. 
From AY 2012-13 to AY 2013-14, the number of international students at Wilmington University increased from 821 to 1106, an increase of 35%. The increase in the international population has created more a more diverse student body.  Appreciating and addressing cultural diversity in the classroom goes beyond meeting the needs of international students by creating a more dynamic and productive learning environment for all students, and a more rewarding teaching experience for faculty (Carnegie Mellon, n.d.).  At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to answer the following questions:

Cultural Variation in the Classroom:  Instructional Strategies.  (Room 220) Presented by Jesse Orlando, Adjunct Faculty.
From AY 2012-13 to AY 2013-14, the number of international students at Wilmington University increased from 821 to 1106, an increase of 35%. Appreciating and addressing cultural diversity in the classroom goes beyond meeting the needs of international students by creating a more dynamic and productive learning environment for all students, and a more rewarding teaching experience for faculty (Carnegie Mellon, n.d.).  This workshop will provide faculty with instructional strategies needed to support a productive learning environment for all students.

Safe Computing Practices for the Classroom and the Home.  (Room 313) Presented by Mark Hufe, Associate Professor, College of Technology. 
The more instructors know about safe computing practices, the better it is for the University community. Given that students and instructors often share data files, each can make the other vulnerable to a malware infection, identity theft or other kinds of cybercrime. This seminar will raise awareness of various current cyber threats and steps to take to protect yourself and others. These tips apply equally well to computing in the classroom and in the home.

Giving Them What They Want! Tips for Providing Feedback to Students. (Room 222)  Presented by Kelly Cheeseman, Adjunct Program Coordinator. 
Students are begging for timely, constructive feedback on assignments, even if they don't think they are!  Do you ever get frustrated with the type of feedback you provide to them, or struggle to get feedback to students in a timely fashion?  If so, this workshop is for you!  This workshop will provide instructors with tips on the type of feedback to provide for students, as well as suggestions for providing feedback in a timely manner.  Attendees will be able to brainstorm strategies that will allow them to refine their skills on feedback given to students.

Giving Them What They Want! Tips for Providing Feedback to Students.  Online Presented by Kelly Cheeseman, Adjunct Program Coordinator. 
Students are begging for timely, constructive feedback on assignments, even if they don't think they are!  Do you ever get frustrated with the type of feedback you provide to them, or struggle to get feedback to students in a timely fashion?  If so, this workshop is for you!  This workshop will provide instructors with tips on the type of feedback to provide for students, as well as suggestions for providing feedback in a timely manner.  Attendees will be able to brainstorm strategies that will allow them to refine their skills on feedback given to students.

Streamlining Grading for Writing:  Less Work, More Effective Feedback.  (Room 223) Presented by Matt Whelihan, Chair-English Department and Kate Cottle, Chair-Literature and Humanities and Assistant Professor. 
Grading writing can be frustrating and time-consuming for instructors whether or not they have writing backgrounds. Sometimes teachers spend hours giving feedback on papers only to discover students don't even look at feedback, which can be disheartening for both instructors and students. This workshop will give instructors strategies to counter these feelings of dissatisfaction. These strategies will save time on giving feedback while making the feedback more effective and accessible for students. We will explore what to comment on, how to comment, and what technological tools can be used to save time in giving feedback.

Technology Tips to Achieve Best Practices in the Online and Hybrid Classroom.  (Room 304) Presented by Mary Beth Youse, Manager-Educational Technology and Adjunct Faculty. 
This workshop will utilize the seven principles (Chickering and Gamson) of best practice and show instructors how to apply them to the online or hybrid classroom. Technologies to support the needs of the classroom will be explored in this session.

Grade Center-How Should I be Using it?  (Room 303) Presented by Holly Conley, Adjunct Professor. 
Grade Center can handle many if not all of your grading tasks for you. Even if you use assignments outside of Blackboard, such as a paper or project that is turned in by students, you can still calculate grades by entering them in Grade Center. Assignments created within Blackboard are sent to Grade Center automatically, so if you've been grading assignments the old fashioned way let Grade Center do the work for you! This session will explore the set-up of Grade Center to match the assignment course outline in Syllabus.

Malcolm Knowles's Principles of Learning and Motivating Students in the Learning Environment. (Room 310) Presented by Stephanie Battis, Chair-Organizational Management and Associate Professor. 
The workshop will discuss Malcolm Knowles and his adult learning principles. Participants will learn how to use these principles in the classroom.

Improving Communication with Students.  (Room 301) Presented by Lisa Drews, Online Coordinator and Adjunct Faculty and Sherry Scanlon, Ed.D, Online Coordinator and Adjunct Professor.  . 
This workshop will discuss various ways to improve student communication. 

The Rubik's Cube of Learning:  Linking Knowledge Construction to the Learner's Time Dimension Scaffolding. (Room 224) (Presented Cynthia Sosnowski, Adjunct Faculty. 
This workshop explores how the instructor can connect course components to the adult learner's past, current, and future experiences to help the learner construct meaningful connections to the material and to support the learning of complex material at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. When we as instructors provide meaningful scaffolding for the construction of new knowledge, we help increase learner motivation and decrease adult learner anxiety, while providing "hooks" that enhance learning new, complex material.

Learn how to evaluate your current course materials and to make revisions that connect your subject matter in a meaningful way to the learner's world while supporting complex learning.

Case Study and the Use of Thought-Provoking Questions to Stimulate Students' Critical Thinking Skills.  (Room 306) Presented by Ken Morlino, D.B.A., Chair-MBA Programs and Assistant Professor. 
Critical thinking research supports the principle that critical thinking skills can be developed in the classroom with instructional strategies that promote students' higher-order thinking skills. Case study is one of many instructional strategies that foster the development of higher levels of thought and analysis.

This workshop will explore the use of thought-provoking questions as an effective means to help students think more critically and to provide the support or scaffolding that can help them develop their higher-order thinking skills.

Writing Expectations for College Students.  (Room 221) Presented by Lara Crowley, Adjunct Faculty.    
This workshop will provide tips on how to establish clear expectations for student writing and how to communicate these expectations with your students.  Topics to be presented include enhancing your course rubrics to better communicate with students, supporting your students' efforts to improve their writing skills, and communicating discipline specific and course level appropriate student writing expectations.  Participants will be able to use the information provided to improve student writing through clearer communication of writing expectations. 

Writing Expectations for College Students.  Online Session -Presented by Lara Crowley, Adjunct Faculty.    
This workshop will provide tips on how to establish clear expectations for student writing and how to communicate these expectations with your students.  Topics to be presented include enhancing your course rubrics to better communicate with students, supporting your students' efforts to improve their writing skills, and communicating discipline specific and course level appropriate student writing expectations.  Participants will be able to use the information provided to improve student writing through clearer communication of writing expectations. 

Technology Support at Wilmington University.  (Room 305) Presented by Joseph Ward, Technology Support Manager.      
This workshop will review the services offered by the technology support department, the basics of IT security awareness, and the process for requesting IT services as Wilmington University.

Effective Use of Group Work.  (Room 201) Presented by Josh Simpson, Manager of Faculty Development and Adjunct Professor. 
This workshop will discuss tips and techniques for implementing effective group work into our classes.  Suggestions will be made to help tie group assignments to Wilmington University's vision of providing career-oriented programming for students.  Registrants are encouraged to bring course planning documents and assignments used in class to the workshop, as time will be devoted toward revising these activities to improve their effectiveness. 

The Benefit to Being an Adjunct Instructor at Wilmington University.  (Room 307) Presented by Nancy Doody, Associate Director of Faculty Development and Support, and Assistant Professor. 
Wilmington University's use of adjunct faculty is one of "choice" rather than chance.  We value you as an instructor and continually seek ways to invite you into the university community.  This informational session will explore the many benefits that are available to you at the university.

Instructional Strategies to Engage Students.   (Room 203) Presented by Diane Bansbach, Chair-Math Department and Assistant Professor.  Instructors will participate in a variety of interactive teaching methods and reflect on how to incorporate them in their classes. Methods will include, but are not limited to: think-pair-share, jig-saw and placemat.

.

Sessions for the 12:00-1:00pm time slot:

Culturally Responsive Engagement Strategies. (Room 202).   Presented by Taryn L. Fletcher, Adjunct Faculty.
The Culturally Responsive Engagement Strategies workshop will introduce and explore Dr. Robert Marzano's four questions to achieving high quality student engagement through the lens of culturally responsiveness.  Participants will interpret and apply engagement strategies and differentiated instructional practices, while reflecting on the four conditions necessary for cultural responsive teaching.

Term Paper: Meaningful Alternatives.  (Room 309) Presented by Ciro Poppiti, III, Adjunct Faculty. 
We are a real-world university, so shouldn't we teach real-world writing techniques?  Our students won't be writing term papers in their careers, but they will most certainly have to write effective emails and memos.  Serendipitously, by focusing classroom time on shorter writing projects, we can actually improve student proficiency.  This workshop focuses on alternatives to the term paper, whether teaching face-to-face or online.  We will delve into the classic 5-paragraph essay, explaining why it is such an important writing technique.  We will look at how to turn students from "reporting" facts to using facts to "prove" their theses.  A number of easy-to-apply tips will be shared, including a pro forma model that teachers can immediately implement.

Responding to Troubled and Troubling Students (Room 311) Presented by Gary Donahue, Assistant Professor – College of Arts & Sciences and Coordinator of Student Issues/Concerns - Student Affairs; and Jack Cunningham, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President-University Safety.
In our efforts to provide for the needs of all students we are sometimes required to provide feedback to students who manifest inappropriate, disruptive, or disturbing behaviors.  This workshop will help instructor's distinguish between a student who is overly challenging and a student who may be in crises.  The workshop will provide specific strategies for responding to students who disrupt the learning environment, inappropriately respond to teacher direction/correction, or attempt to engage the instructor in an "email war".  Additionally, knowing how to identify, confront, and care for students who appear to exhibit behaviors that raise questions about a student's health or well-being will also be addressed.  This workshop will provide practical insights related to these concerns and also identify specific steps that can be taken when "feedback of a different kind" is needed.

Giving Your Students the Keys to Success.  (Room 216) Presented by Debbie B. Taylor, Manager-Student Success Center and Adjunct Faculty, and Sally Healy, Director-Student Success Center. 
The Student Success Center offers a wide range of services that help our students achieve academic success.  Whether they are incoming freshman, a returning adult student, a transfer student, or a graduate student, the SSC can provide our students with the support and resources necessary to achieve their goals.  Realize the power you have to inspire your students to choose success.

Discovery as the Precursor to Reading and Citation in the Academic Endeavor. (Room 204) Presented by Jim McCloskey, Ed.D. Director-
 The WilmU Library collects and provides access to thousands of ejournals and ebooks. But as someone recently noted, "If we can't find it, as readers, we certainly won't be using it." The search process for quality, relevant resources has morphed from a context in which students were focused on a defined subset of content (ie, a single bibliographic database) to an environment through which a single search box, known as "web-scale discovery," can unveil the entire range of library content. This workshop will introduce the University community to the Library's new Discovery system.

Cultural Variation in the Classroom:  Who Are Our Students?  (Room 220) Presented by Jesse Orlando, Adjunct Faculty.
From AY 2012-13 to AY 2013-14, the number of international students at Wilmington University increased from 821 to 1106, an increase of 35%. The increase in the international population has created more a more diverse student body.  Appreciating and addressing cultural diversity in the classroom goes beyond meeting the needs of international students by creating a more dynamic and productive learning environment for all students, and a more rewarding teaching experience for faculty (Carnegie Mellon, n.d.).  At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to answer the following questions:

Cultural Variation in the Classroom: Instructional Strategies.  (Room 312) Presented by Adriana Marini Cossetti, Adjunct Faculty.
From AY 2012-13 to AY 2013-14, the number of international students at Wilmington University increased from 821 to 1106, an increase of 35%. Appreciating and addressing cultural diversity in the classroom goes beyond meeting the needs of international students by creating a more dynamic and productive learning environment for all students, and a more rewarding teaching experience for faculty (Carnegie Mellon, n.d.).  This workshop will provide faculty with instructional strategies needed to support a productive learning environment for all students.

Safe Computing Practices for the Classroom and the Home.  (Room 313) Presented by Mark Hufe, Associate Professor, College of Technology. 
The more instructors know about safe computing practices, the better it is for the University community. Given that students and instructors often share data files, each can make the other vulnerable to a malware infection, identity theft or other kinds of cybercrime. This seminar will raise awareness of various current cyber threats and steps to take to protect yourself and others. These tips apply equally well to computing in the classroom and in the home.

Giving Them What They Want! Tips for Providing Feedback to Students. (Room 224) Presented by Kelly Cheeseman, Adjunct Program Coordinator. 
Students are begging for timely, constructive feedback on assignments, even if they don't think they are!  Do you ever get frustrated with the type of feedback you provide to them, or struggle to get feedback to students in a timely fashion?  If so, this workshop is for you!  This workshop will provide instructors with tips on the type of feedback to provide for students, as well as suggestions for providing feedback in a timely manner.  Attendees will be able to brainstorm strategies that will allow them to refine their skills on feedback given to students.

Streamlining Grading for Writing:  Less Work, More Effective Feedback.  (Room 221) Presented by Matt Whelihan, Chair-English Department and Kate Cottle, Chair-Literature and Humanities and Assistant Professor. 
Grading writing can be frustrating and time-consuming for instructors whether or not they have writing backgrounds. Sometimes teachers spend hours giving feedback on papers only to discover students don't even look at feedback, which can be disheartening for both instructors and students. This workshop will give instructors strategies to counter these feelings of dissatisfaction. These strategies will save time on giving feedback while making the feedback more effective and accessible for students. We will explore what to comment on, how to comment, and what technological tools can be used to save time in giving feedback.

Streamlining Grading for Writing:  Less Work, More Effective Feedback.  Online Presented by Matt Whelihan, Chair-English Department and Kate Cottle, Chair-Literature and Humanities and Assistant Professor. 
Grading writing can be frustrating and time-consuming for instructors whether or not they have writing backgrounds. Sometimes teachers spend hours giving feedback on papers only to discover students don't even look at feedback, which can be disheartening for both instructors and students. This workshop will give instructors strategies to counter these feelings of dissatisfaction. These strategies will save time on giving feedback while making the feedback more effective and accessible for students. We will explore what to comment on, how to comment, and what technological tools can be used to save time in giving feedback.

Technology Tips to Achieve Best Practices in the Online and Hybrid Classroom.  (Room 304) Presented by Mary Beth Youse, Manager-Educational Technology and Adjunct Faculty. 
This workshop will utilize the seven principles (Chickering and Gamson) of best practice and show instructors how to apply them to the online or hybrid classroom. Technologies to support the needs of the classroom will be explored in this session.

Grade Center-How Should I be Using it?  (Room 303) Presented by Holly Conley, Adjunct Professor. 
Grade Center can handle many if not all of your grading tasks for you. Even if you use assignments outside of Blackboard, such as a paper or project that is turned in by students, you can still calculate grades by entering them in Grade Center. Assignments created within Blackboard are sent to Grade Center automatically, so if you've been grading assignments the old fashioned way let Grade Center do the work for you! This session will explore the set-up of Grade Center to match the assignment course outline in Syllabus.

Grading in Blackboard:  What's in it for me?  (Room 310) Presented by Niecy LeBright, Regional Chair, Dover - College of Arts and Sciences
A faculty demonstration of the benefits and ease of creating embedded rubrics, evaluating assignments and activities, and providing feedback through the grade center.  This workshop will provide an overview of how to use in-line grading features for discussions, blogs, presentations, and papers that will make the instructor's grading much easier, faster, and ultimately better for the student.  Whether you teach face to face or online, using the tools in the grade center will save you time and can improve your IDEA evaluations.

Improving Communication with Students.  (Room 301) Presented by Lisa Drews, Online Coordinator and Adjunct Faculty and Sherry Scanlon, Ed.D, Online Coordinator and Adjunct Professor.    
This workshop will discuss various ways to improve student communication. 

The Rubik's Cube of Learning:  Linking Knowledge Construction to the Learner's Time Dimension Scaffolding. (Room 222) Presented Cynthia Sosnowski, Adjunct Faculty. 
This workshop explores how the instructor can connect course components to the adult learner's past, current, and future experiences to help the learner construct meaningful connections to the material and to support the learning of complex material at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. When we as instructors provide meaningful scaffolding for the construction of new knowledge, we help increase learner motivation and decrease adult learner anxiety, while providing "hooks" that enhance learning new, complex material.

Learn how to evaluate your current course materials and to make revisions that connect your subject matter in a meaningful way to the learner's world while supporting complex learning.

The Rubik's Cube of Learning:  Linking Knowledge Construction to the Learner's Time Dimension Scaffolding. Online Presented Cynthia Sosnowski, Adjunct Faculty. 
This workshop explores how the instructor can connect course components to the adult learner's past, current, and future experiences to help the learner construct meaningful connections to the material and to support the learning of complex material at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. When we as instructors provide meaningful scaffolding for the construction of new knowledge, we help increase learner motivation and decrease adult learner anxiety, while providing "hooks" that enhance learning new, complex material.

Learn how to evaluate your current course materials and to make revisions that connect your subject matter in a meaningful way to the learner's world while supporting complex learning.

Case Study and the Use of Thought-Provoking Questions to Stimulate Students' Critical Thinking Skills.  (Room 306) Presented by Ken Morlino, D.B.A., Chair-MBA Programs and Assistant Professor. 
Critical thinking research supports the principle that critical thinking skills can be developed in the classroom with instructional strategies that promote students' higher-order thinking skills. Case study is one of many instructional strategies that foster the development of higher levels of thought and analysis.

This workshop will explore the use of thought-provoking questions as an effective means to help students think more critically and to provide the support or scaffolding that can help them develop their higher-order thinking skills.

Writing Expectations for College Students.  (Room 223) Presented by Lara Crowley, Adjunct Faculty.    
This workshop will provide tips on how to establish clear expectations for student writing and how to communicate these expectations with your students.  Topics to be presented include enhancing your course rubrics to better communicate with students, supporting your students' efforts to improve their writing skills, and communicating discipline specific and course level appropriate student writing expectations.  Participants will be able to use the information provided to improve student writing through clearer communication of writing expectations. 

Technology Support at Wilmington University.  (Room 305) Presented by Joseph Ward, Technology Support Manager.      
This workshop will review the services offered by the technology support department, the basics of IT security awareness, and the process for requesting IT services as Wilmington University.

Effective Use of Group Work. (Room 201)Presented by Josh Simpson, Manager of Faculty Development and Adjunct Professor. 
This workshop will discuss tips and techniques for implementing effective group work into our classes.  Suggestions will be made to help tie group assignments to Wilmington University's vision of providing career-oriented programming for students.  Registrants are encouraged to bring course planning documents and assignments used in class to the workshop, as time will be devoted toward revising these activities to improve their effectiveness. 

The Benefit to Being an Adjunct Instructor at Wilmington University. (Room 307) Presented by Nancy Doody, Associate Director of Faculty Development and Support, and Assistant Professor. 
Wilmington University's use of adjunct faculty is one of "choice" rather than chance.  We value you as an instructor and continually seek ways to invite you into the university community.  This informational session will explore the many benefits that are available to you at the university.

 Instructional Strategies to Engage Students.  (Room 203) Presented by Diane Bansbach, Chair-Math Department and Assistant Professor. 
Instructors will participate in a variety of interactive teaching methods and reflect on how to incorporate them in their classes. Methods will include, but are not limited to: think-pair-share, jig-saw and placemat.