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Behavioral Science, Bachelor of Science

Purpose

The purpose of the Bachelor of Science degree program in Behavioral Science is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of how social issues, social environments, and cultural influences impact individual and group behaviors. With a Wilmington University Behavioral Science degree, students will gain the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in careers working with adolescents and teens, families, the elderly, the homeless, the court systems, government agencies, addictions, crisis interventions, and more. Upon completion of the program, students seek careers in the human services, government, business, and industry. Students seeking graduate degree options may consider Master’s degrees in social work, sociology, psychology, human services, public administration, criminology, counseling, or human resource management.

Program of Study

The program includes courses in psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. Course work emphasizes normal and abnormal individual development, as well as family, group, and cultural dimensions of behavior. Ethical and professional issues are also addressed. Skill development in interpersonal relations, problem solving, and evaluation of programs and research is stressed. In addition, General Education courses required of all Wilmington University undergraduates provide a well-rounded academic foundation.

Classroom courses provide a blend of theory and application. Students also have the option to explore internship opportunities throughout the community in a variety of settings which provide experiences in applying knowledge and skills. The program is offered statewide, with day and evening classes offered at New Castle, Dover, and Georgetown. The program is also offered in New Jersey at Mt. Laurel and Cumberland. The program is also available online.

Program Competencies

Knowledge:

Demonstrate the ability to define and explain theory and application within the Behavioral Science disciplines with regard to:

  1. Change and development at individual, group, and societal levels.
  2. Individual differences, group variations, and social deviance.
  3. Micro- and macro-level processes involving individuals, groups and societies.
  4. Empirical and ethical issues related to the systematic study of individual, group and societal processes.

Skills: Related to the Behavioral Science Disciplines

  1. Demonstrate effective oral and written presentation skills.
  2. Demonstrate effective critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, plan, implement, analyze, and report formal inquiry in the behavioral sciences.
  4. Demonstrate effective utilization of current technologies.
  5. Demonstrate the ability, skills, and flexible thinking necessary to explore the various applications of behavioral science in the real world, including career options.

Personal and Professional Development

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of one’s strengths and limitations, interests, aptitudes, values, goals, commitment to self-directedness, self-discipline, and planning for present and lifelong learning, career identification, and development.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of self in relation to others, including effective interpersonal communication skills, ability to work in teams, and respect for diversity and multiculturalism in a pluralistic society.

Cooperative Education

For additional information about what course placements have already been developed, or to request additional information about how to propose your own co-op placement click “Here


Program Policies

Elective Guidelines

The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences recommends that students who transfer in six or more core courses and all 18 credits of core electives use any remaining electives to increase their subject knowledge by taking upper level electives in their field. These will include the interdisciplinary electives identified from the other academic colleges.

Minimum Grade Policy

The Behavioral Science program has set a minimum passing grade of “C-” for program core courses. Students receiving a grade lower than “C-” in any required core course must retake that course.


Curriculum

General Education Requirements (40 credits)

CTA 206 Computer Applications

ECO 105 Fundamentals of Economics

ENG 121 English Composition I

ENG 122 English Composition II

ENG 131 Public Speaking

ENG 310 Research Writing

HIS 381 Contemporary Global Issues

OR

POL 300 American Politics

MAT 205 Introductory Survey of Mathematics

PHI 100 Introduction to Critical Thinking

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Natural Science Elective with Lab (4 Credits)

HUM Humanities Elective

Behavioral Science Core (45 credits)

MAT 308 Inferential Statistics

PHI 302 Ethics and Values in Behavioral Science

SOC 302 Marriage and the Family

SOC 304 Ethnic Groups and Minorities

SOC 306 Cultural Anthropology

SOC 318 Social Change

SOC 331 Research, Writing and Information Literacy in the Behavioral Sciences

PSY 309 Interpersonal Communication Skills

 

SOC 405 Social Deviance

OR

PSY 305 Abnormal Psychology

 

SOC 340 Applied Research Design

OR

PSY 340 Research Methods in Psychology

 

SOC 409 Seminar in Applied Behavioral Science

OR

PSY 409 Seminar in Psychology

 

SOC 490 Internship in Behavioral Science (Behavioral Science majors)

OR

Upper Level Behavioral Science Elective

 

Select 6 credits from upper level (300-400) courses beginning with the SOC prefix.

Choose one Developmental course from the following:

PSY 329 Lifespan Development

PSY 330 Infant and Toddler Development

PSY 332 Adolescent Development

PSY 336 Child Development

PSY 401 Adult Development and Aging

Behavioral Science Electives (18 credits)

Courses beginning with the prefix CRJ, PSY, ORG, or SOC may be used as Behavioral Science electives. In addition, the following courses may also be selected as Behavioral Science electives:

 

POL 326 Public Policy and Social Issues

POL 350 Economic, Welfare and Income Policy

POL 380 Health Care Policy

NOTE: Guided Practicum (SOC 290-SOC 291) as well as Internship (SOC 490) and Co-op (SOC 450) experiences are available.

Free Electives (18 credits)

Students with less than 16 transfer credits are required to take FYE 101 as one of their electives.

Concentration in Human Services

The Behavioral Science Program’s Concentration in Human Services provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to obtain specialized knowledge within the field of Human Services. Students will learn to work across a range of human needs through a spectrum of courses covering current social issues, working in the helping professions, and theories of personality. This concentration will be of great benefit to students who desire to work as a youth worker, minister, family support worker, client advocate, case manager, community organizer, and many other professions. The Concentration in Human Services is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of human behavior and help them develop the skills necessary to function as a human services professional. There is also the added benefit that students who graduate with a Concentration in Human Services will be better positioned to begin their master’s degree in the Administration of Human Services at Wilmington University. Overall, students who earn a degree with a concentration in Human Services will distinguish themselves from others in the workplace and will acquire a valuable, competitive advantage in any profession and gain the knowledge and skills to work effectively in their chosen career in culturally competent ways, to communicate effectively both orally and in writing, and to provide specialty services.


The “General Education Requirements” and “Behavioral Science Core” curriculum for the Human Services concentration remain unchanged. The only difference is the SOC electives are limited to courses required for the concentration.

Behavioral Science Electives (6 Credits)

Human Services Concentration (12 Credits)

SOC 312 Community Health & Social Issues

SOC 464 Working in the Helping Professions

SOC 468 Case Management

Students must choose one upper level SOC elective (or an elective from another discipline with program chair’s approval)

Suggested Program Sequence

Freshman

1st Semester

CTA 206 Computer Applications

ENG 121 English Composition I

FYE 101 First Year Experience Seminar

PHI 100 Introduction to Critical Thinking

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

2nd Semester

ENG 122 English Composition II

MAT 205 Introductory Survey of Mathematics

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

ECO 105 Fundamentals of Economics

Free Elective

Sophomore

1st Semester

ENG 131 Public Speaking

Dev. Psych Elective

Behavioral Science Elective

HUM Humanities Elective

Behavioral Science Core: Choose any course beginning with the prefix SOC.

2nd Semester

MAT 308 Inferential Statistics

Free Elective

Natural Science Elective with Lab (4 Credits)

ENG 310 Research Writing

SOC 302 Marriage and the Family

Junior

1st Semester

PSY 309 Interpersonal Communication Skills

 

SOC 405 Social Deviance

OR

PSY 305 Abnormal Psychology

 

HUM 381 Contemporary Global Issues

OR

POL 300 American Politics

 

SOC 331 Research, Writing and Information Literacy in the Behavioral Sciences

Behavioral Science Elective

2nd Semester

SOC 304 Ethnic Groups and Minorities

PSY 340 Research Methods in Psychology

OR

SOC 340 Applied Research Design

SOC 318 Social Change

SOC 306 Cultural Anthropology

Behavioral Science Elective

Senior

1st Semester

PHI 302 Ethics and Values in Behavioral Science

SOC 490 Internship in Behavioral Science (Behavioral Science majors)

OR

Upper Level Behavioral Science Elective

 

Behavioral Science Elective

Free Elective

Free Elective

2nd Semester

SOC 409 Seminar in Applied Behavioral Science

OR

PSY 409 Seminar in Psychology

Behavioral Science Elective

Behavioral Science Elective

Free Elective

Behavioral Science Core: Choose any course beginning with the prefix SOC.

Behavioral Science Completion Degree

What is a Completion Degree?

A Completion Degree is a personalized version of a Bachelor’s degree created exclusively for students who have completed an Associate’s degree at an accredited institution. A student who expects to transfer a completed Associate’s degree should communicate with a Wilmington University Academic Advisor before registering for courses. An official transcript with documentation of the conferred degree must be received by Wilmington University to confirm eligibility.

Curriculum

As a transfer student who holds an Associate's degree from a partner institution, the following Behavioral Science courses are required.

MAT 308 Inferential Statistics

PHI 302 Ethics and Values in Behavioral Science

 

PSY 305 Abnormal Psychology

OR

SOC 405 Social Deviance

 

PSY 309 Interpersonal Communication Skills

 

Upper Level Behavioral Science Elective

OR

SOC 490 Internship in Behavioral Science (Behavioral Science majors)

 

SOC 302 Marriage and the Family

SOC 304 Ethnic Groups and Minorities

SOC 306 Cultural Anthropology

SOC 318 Social Change

SOC 331 Research, Writing and Information Literacy in the Behavioral Sciences

SOC 340 Applied Research Design

SOC 409 Seminar in Applied Behavioral Science

Dev. Psych Elective

Upper Level Behavioral Science Elective

Upper Level Behavioral Science Elective


The following courses or their equivalents are prerequisites for a degree in Behavioral Science:
ENG 122 English Composition II

MAT 205 Introductory Survey of Mathematics

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Natural Science Elective with Lab



This information applies to students who enter this degree program during the 2019-2020 Academic Year. If you entered this degree program before the Fall 2019 semester, please refer to the academic catalog for the year you began your degree program.